Poetry2Go

Month: May 2019


I just read this very interesting article written by Es Devin, artist and designer and published in Google's blog "The Key Word,"  who collaborated with Google Arts & Culture Lab and Ross Goodwin to create POEMPORTRAITS:

 


POEMPORTRAITS is an online collective artwork, experimenting at the boundaries of AI and human collaboration—a combination of poetry, design and machine learning. A POEMPORTRAIT is your self portrait overlaid with a unique poem, created by AI. Starting today, you can create your own and contribute to the evolving, collective poem.

To create your POEMPORTAIT, head to g.co/poemportraits. Once you get there, you’ll be asked to donate a word of your choice and take a self portrait. Each word you donate will be expanded into original lines of poetry by an algorithm that’s trained on millions of words of nineteenth century poetry. You’ll then receive a unique POEMPORTRAIT of your face, illuminated by your original lines of poetry. All of the lines of poetry are then combined to form an ever-evolving, collective poem.

To create the technology behind POEMPORTRAITS, I collaborated with Google Arts & Culture Lab and Ross Goodwin. Ross trained an algorithm to learn to write poems by reading over 25 million words written by 19th century poets. It works a bit like predictive text: it doesn’t copy or rework existing phrases, but uses its training material to build a complex statistical model. As a result, the algorithm generates original phrases emulating the style of what it’s been trained on.

The resulting poems can be surprisingly poignant, and at other times nonsensical. And it’s the profoundly human way that we seek and find personal resonance in machine-generated text that’s the essence of this project. I was inspired by the writing of Shoshana Zuboff on the “information civilization”—she writes, “If the digital future is to be our home then it is we who must make it so.”

Here’s my POEMPORTRAIT; the word I chose to donate was “convergence.”

Create your unique POEMPORTRAIT and become part of this ever-growing global poem at g.co/poemportraits."


Well, that's the end of the article.  I found it interesting, and maybe you will too!


Dead Drift | by Jude Nutter

Water shelving off into darkness and the mind,
which accepts the river’s depth, is perplexed
by the eyes’ denial. Flat as shadow

on grass you lie, watching the mouth
of the net held close to the bank, waiting
for a wide-open, astonished eye, for a wedge
of head to cohere out of silt and present
itself, as all beings born into time
do, with defiance and out of matter
both moving and held
motionless in suspension. Then the quick

veer, the glint-thrill, the solid, flexed silm
of a body at the surface as it turns. After that,
the backwash, a sluggish roil, the vane of a tail

receding. Where was I, you think, before I
was suddenly here – cleaved cell, a gyre

of code unlocked? In the net’s uneasy
alchemy each brown trout
rests, finning in place, nose to the current,
until your father, who caught each fish and slipped
each hook and holds the net, submerges

its rim and decants each life back
into the flow of the river – not a fish, not a trout, no
nameable shape – just a finned smear, a flare
of copper. Then nothing but your own reflection
restored to the water’s surface as the water
restores its mirror. Early evening, a sudden

coolness filming the skin and, as if
some marvellous army has placed its shield wall
to rest, canted sunlight falling
in blazons on the water. Here, for a while, before

humping north to face the tribes
of Caledonia, a small and weary detachment
from the Ninth Legion of Rome did
place their shields and their weapons down,
right here, on the banks of the Wharfe,
and named their settlement Calcaria, meaning
lime. The pale blocks of empire quarried, right here,
by slaves, on territory stolen from the Celtic tribes,
on the great north road to Eboracum.
But before all this – before the Brigantes

and Romans and Vikings and French, before flints
and axes and spear blades; before the age
of long barrows and dolmens; before the first
brattle of war and occupation and everyadvance and obliteration of history, there was stone
and the stone’s own story of molluscs and forams
and corals. Evidence of oceans, of time’s
crushing indifference. Out in that river,

in chest-high waders, your father is loading
his rod for the cast; the loop of the line unfurls
and the fly – a Pale Evening Dun – settles
on a seam where two currents meet and

dead drifts to where eddies mark a trout
sipping mayfly from the surface. Not once
have you asked your father why, when he crimps
the barbs flat against the shank of every hook and files
them smooth and then releases
every fish he fights and fatigues and plays

into the net, he even fishes at all. Perhaps
it has something to do with how the fly
presents itself perfectly on the water; or the line,
a filament of sky come lose, unfurling. No, not the fly,
or the line, but his arm casting. No, not that: not

the casting, but the arm lifting, suddenly,
to set the hook. No not even the arm,
but the whole body reacting. A river
is a closed door that opens everywhere
and always and only into itself and in the long,
continuous lick of its current is a man
standing motionless, braced

for the strike. And before there was pigment,
before the first flute, before fire; and until all the hands
silhouetted in ochre, until the aurochs and ibex
and spotted horses walked out of the mind as the mind
unhooked itself from darkness,
there was this: the whole body reacting – animal,
instinctive. And after, not the reaction,

but the seconds it took – not many, but one; no,
not even one, not the seconds at all,
but that fraction of unmeasurable time in which

whatever was about to be done
remained undone.

Poet's Note: Stanzas 12, 13 and 15 owe a formal debt to Stephanie Brown’s poem Constellation, inspired by a line from Dan Pagis’ poem The Art of Contraction

***

Jude Nutter has won the €10,000 Moth Poetry Prize for her poem Dead Drift at a special event at Poetry Ireland in Dublin last night, as part of the Poetry Day Ireland celebrations.

Nutter, who was born in Yorkshire and grew up in Hannover in Germany, has a family home in Dingle in Kerry, and divides her time between there and Minneapolis, where she has been working since 2000.

Information and image from  The Irish Times


Robin

Kind husband, vigilant father, loving son, mischievous brother

Brother of Lizard and Kippie-Bombs

Lover of Kahtabeak, Danbug and Benbot

Who feels joyful, happy and satisfied

Who fears brown recluse spiders, level 4 biohazards and tsunamis

Who would like to see an end to war, famine and death

Resident of Sherwood Forest

Hood

Copyright © Mark Toney | Year Posted 2019

***

Poetry notes:
01/25/2019

Poetry form:  Bio  -A poem written about one self's life, personality traits, and ambitions.

Bio Poem Example

Line 1: First name
Line 2: Four traits that describe you
Line 3: Brother/ Sister of ... (may substitute son/daughter of)
Line 4: Lover of ... (Give names of three people or ideas)
Line 5: Who feels ... (Give three feelings)
Line 6: Who fears ... (Give three items)
Line 7: Who would like to see ... (Give three items)
Line 8: Resident of ... (Give city and state)
Line 9: Last name only

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