Poetry2Go

December Morning in the Desert

Alberto Ríos - 1952-

The morning is clouded and the birds are hunched,
More cold than hungry, more numb than loud,

This crisp, Arizona shore, where desert meets
The coming edge of the winter world.

It is a cold news in stark announcement,
The myriad stars making bright the black,

As if the sky itself had been snowed upon.
But the stars—all those stars,

Where does the sure noise of their hard work go?
These plugs sparking the motor of an otherwise quiet sky,

Their flickering work everywhere in a white vastness:
We should hear the stars as a great roar

Gathered from the moving of their billion parts, this great
Hot rod skid of the Milky Way across the asphalt night,

The assembled, moving glints and far-floating embers
Risen from the hearth-fires of so many other worlds.

Where does the noise of it all go
If not into the ears, then hearts of the birds all around us,

Their hearts beating so fast and their equally fast
Wings and high songs,

And the bees, too, with their lumbering hum,
And the wasps and moths, the bats, and the dragonflies—

None of them sure if any of this is going to work,
This universe—we humans oblivious,

Drinking coffee, not quite awake, calm and moving
Into the slippers of our Monday mornings,

Shivering because, we think,
It’s a little cold out there.


Sympathy

I know what the caged bird feels, alas!
    When the sun is bright on the upland slopes;
When the wind stirs soft through the springing grass,
And the river flows like a stream of glass;
    When the first bird sings and the first bud opes,
And the faint perfume from its chalice steals—
I know what the caged bird feels!
I know why the caged bird beats his wing
    Till its blood is red on the cruel bars;
For he must fly back to his perch and cling
When he fain would be on the bough a-swing;
    And a pain still throbs in the old, old scars
And they pulse again with a keener sting—
I know why he beats his wing!
I know why the caged bird sings, ah me,
    When his wing is bruised and his bosom sore,—
When he beats his bars and he would be free;
It is not a carol of joy or glee,
    But a prayer that he sends from his heart’s deep core,
But a plea, that upward to Heaven he flings—
I know why the caged bird sings!
***
Poetry notes:
Paul Laurence. Dunbar, "“Sympathy.”" from The Complete Poems of Paul Laurence Dunbar. (New York: Dodd, Mead and Company, )
Source: Twentieth-Century American Poetry (2004)

Bushlands Celebrity

free-roaming feral

Australian mob of brumbies-

Snowy River Man

 

***
Poetry notes:
8/21/2019

Poetry form:  Haiku


A Smile To Remember | Charles Bukowski
1920-1994

we had goldfish and they circled around and around
in the bowl on the table near the heavy drapes
covering the picture window and
my mother, always smiling, wanting us all
to be happy, told me, "be happy Henry!"
and she was right: it's better to be happy if you
can
but my father continued to beat her and me several times a week while
raging inside his 6-foot-two frame because he couldn't
understand what was attacking him from within.my mother, poor fish,
wanting to be happy, beaten two or three times a
week, telling me to be happy: "Henry, smile!
why don't you ever smile?"

and then she would smile, to show me how, and it was the
saddest smile I ever saw

one day the goldfish died, all five of them,
they floated on the water, on their sides, their
eyes still open,
and when my father got home he threw them to the cat
there on the kitchen floor and we watched as my mother
smiled

***

Charles Bukowski [1920-1994] was one of the most famous of the American poets of his time. He was first published in his 20s, but gave up serious writing for the world of work and bars. He spent a lot of time roaming from job to job living in rooming houses from the East coast to the West coast before joining the United States Postal Service in Los Angeles. His life at that time bordered on insanity and death, two prevalent themes in his writing.

***


Eve Remembering | Toni Morrison
1931-2019

1

I tore from a limb fruit that had lost its green.
My hands were warmed by the heat of an apple
Fire red and humming.
I bit sweet power to the core.
How can I say what it was like?
The taste! The taste undid my eyes
And led me far from the gardens planted for a child
To wildernesses deeper than any master’s call.

2

Now these cool hands guide what they once caressed;
Lips forget what they have kissed.
My eyes now pool their light
Better the summit to see.

3

I would do it all over again:
Be the harbor and set the sail,
Loose the breeze and harness the gale,
Cherish the harvest of what I have been.
Better the summit to scale.
Better the summit to be.


***

Toni Morrison was born on February 18, 1931, in Lorain, Ohio. She received a BA from Howard University in 1953 and an MA from Cornell University in 1955. She was the author of one volume of poetry, Five Poems (Rainmaker Editions, 2002), which features poems alongside illustrations by Kara Walker. She is the recipient of a Pulitzer Prize in Fiction, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the 1993 Nobel Prize for Literature. She died on August 5, 2019 in New York.

***


Jabberwocky | Lewis Carroll

’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe. 

“Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!”

He took his vorpal sword in hand;
Long time the manxome foe he sought—
So rested he by the Tumtum tree
And stood awhile in thought. 

And, as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
And burbled as it came! 

One, two! One, two! And through and through
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went galumphing back.

 “And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!”
He chortled in his joy. 

’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.


***

Lewis Carroll’s Jabberwocky appeared in 1871 when Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There was published.  Many of the words in the poem are nonsense words of Carroll’s own invention, such as “galumphing.”  Many of us share Alice’s impression after reading it:

“It seems very pretty, but it’s rather hard to understand!  Somehow it seems to fill my head with ideas—only I don’t exactly know what they are! However, somebody killed something: that’s clear, at any rate.”

Illustration credit:  "Beware the Jabberwock, my Son" by John Tenniel

***


USWNT

 

Listen what I say
U S A  say
Love to watch them play
U S A  play
Jump into the fray
U S A  fray
Going all the way
U S A  way

I've got the soccer itch
My team has perfect pitch
3 shutouts with no glitch
First place their current niche

Listen what I say
U S A  say
Love to watch them play
U S A  play
Jump into the fray
U S A  fray
Going all the way
U S A  way

Begin the knockout stage
Best teams will now engage
World Cup is all the rage
Women's soccer's come of age

Listen what I say (say)
Soccer  say
Love to watch them play (play)
U S A  play
Jump into the fray (fray)
Football  fray
Going all the way (way)
World Cup  way

'Bonne chance' to other teams
Pursuing football dreams
Planning out their winning schemes
While the crowd cheers and screams

Listen what I say (say)
Soccer say (say)
I love to watch them play (play)
U S A  play
Jump into the fray (fray)
Football fray (fray)
Going all the way (way)
World Cup way (way)

It's in their DNA...
Women's soccer's brand new day!

***
Poetry notes:
6/21/2019

Poetry form: Lyric

Header photo: Introducing Tricolore 19 –Official Match Ball for the  knockout rounds!


George Harrison MBE

George Harrison
Quiet Beatle by comparison
Kermit the Frog was one of his peeps
Still his guitar gently weeps

 

***
Poetry notes:
06/11/2019

Copyright © 2019 by Mark Toney. All rights reserved.

Poetry form: Clerihew - These Clerihew poems are perfectly cooked in their own juices, resulting in Clerihew Au Jus ! Bon appétit !

Tom Petty, Jeff Lynne, Steve Winwood, Dhani Harrison & Prince
"While My Guitar Gently Weeps" - A Tribute to George Harrison


Denunciation | Marie Under

I cry aloud with all my people’s mouths,
our land is smitten by a plague of fear and lead,
our land is shadowed by the gallows tree
our land   a common graveyard, huge with dead.

Who’ll come to help? Right here, at present, now!
Because the patient’s weak, has lost his hold.
But, like the call of birds, my shouting fades
in emptiness: the world is arrogant and cold.

The sighing of the old, the baby’s cry —
do they all run to sand, illusion, fail?
Men, women groan like wounded deer
to those in power all this is just a fairy-tale.

Dark is the world’s eye, its ear is deaf,
the powerful lost in madness or stupidity.
Compassion’s only felt by those whom suffering breaks,
and sufferers alone have hearts like you and me.

***

Marie Under was one of the greatest Estonian poets ever lived;  EstonianWorld.com publishes six of her poems in full.

Who was Marie Under and why is she so important for Estonians? Like many Estonian cultural greats of the turbulent 20th century, who lived during the oppressive Soviet occupation, her story is full both of joy and sadness.

Born into the family of a teacher from Hiiumaa in 1883, she showed a talent for literature from an early age, starting to read at four and write her first poems at fourteen. She studied German, French and Russian in her early years at a private German Language School (her education later helped her translate German poetry and drama into Estonian).

After brief stints working at the newspaper Teataja and filling her free time writing poetry in German (which, at the time, was considered the most important language in Estonia, due to the country’s history), she got married in 1902 and lived in Moscow for four years. During this period, it was the Estonian artist, Ants Laikmaa, who convinced her to start writing her poetry in Estonian. It is also believed that Laikmaa fell in love with her and he also painted many portraits of the poetess.  -estonianworld.com

Cover: Marie Under (portrait by Ants Laikmaa).


I just read this very interesting article written by Es Devin, artist and designer and published in Google's blog "The Key Word,"  who collaborated with Google Arts & Culture Lab and Ross Goodwin to create POEMPORTRAITS:

 


POEMPORTRAITS is an online collective artwork, experimenting at the boundaries of AI and human collaboration—a combination of poetry, design and machine learning. A POEMPORTRAIT is your self portrait overlaid with a unique poem, created by AI. Starting today, you can create your own and contribute to the evolving, collective poem.

To create your POEMPORTAIT, head to g.co/poemportraits. Once you get there, you’ll be asked to donate a word of your choice and take a self portrait. Each word you donate will be expanded into original lines of poetry by an algorithm that’s trained on millions of words of nineteenth century poetry. You’ll then receive a unique POEMPORTRAIT of your face, illuminated by your original lines of poetry. All of the lines of poetry are then combined to form an ever-evolving, collective poem.

To create the technology behind POEMPORTRAITS, I collaborated with Google Arts & Culture Lab and Ross Goodwin. Ross trained an algorithm to learn to write poems by reading over 25 million words written by 19th century poets. It works a bit like predictive text: it doesn’t copy or rework existing phrases, but uses its training material to build a complex statistical model. As a result, the algorithm generates original phrases emulating the style of what it’s been trained on.

The resulting poems can be surprisingly poignant, and at other times nonsensical. And it’s the profoundly human way that we seek and find personal resonance in machine-generated text that’s the essence of this project. I was inspired by the writing of Shoshana Zuboff on the “information civilization”—she writes, “If the digital future is to be our home then it is we who must make it so.”

Here’s my POEMPORTRAIT; the word I chose to donate was “convergence.”

Create your unique POEMPORTRAIT and become part of this ever-growing global poem at g.co/poemportraits."


Well, that's the end of the article.  I found it interesting, and maybe you will too!

Follow, Friend, Like or Pin

Archives

eBook 2Go